You must see Rome at least once

Victor Emmanuel II Monument – Built in honour of Victor Emmanuel, the first king of an unified Italy, this bombastic monument may appear to be solid white marble but actually contains many rooms inside. It was designed by Giuseppe Sacconi in 1885 and completed in 1925. There are two permanent museums, one on Italian Reunification and one on emigration from Italy, as well as other spaces that host rotating exhibitions. The Victor Emmanuel Monument is not exactly known as one of Rome’s most beautiful structures but it is nevertheless well worth the visit, even if only for the great views from the top.

Strategically set 50 meters above the Tiber, the Palatine Hill shows evidence of Rome’s earliest settlement: rock-cuttings found in front of the Temple of Cybele show human activity as long ago as the ninth century BC. Later, this was the site chosen by the emperors and great aristocratic families for their palaces.

The Farnese Gardens were laid out on the hill in the 16th century for Cardinal Alessandro Farnese, a pleasure park of terraces, pavilions, lawns, flowerbeds, trees, and fountains designed as a kind of stage-setting for social gatherings. Highlights of the Palatine Hill are the House of Livia (Augustus’ wife), the semi-subterranean Cryptoporticus, Domus Flavia, Domus Augustana, and most imposing of all, the Baths of Septimius Severus. The Palatine Hill is a lovely place to explore, combining a park with magnificent and impressive ruins of ancient Rome.

Pantheon – One of the best preserved Roman buildings, The Pantheon was built in 126 AD as a temple for all the Roman gods. The temple has served as a Roman Catholic Church since the 7th century. Eight graceful granite Corinthian columns extend across the front of this circular building, with lesser columns in back.

Though it is 2,000 years old, the Pantheon’s famous dome remains the world’s largest unreinforced concrete dome. It is believed Marcus Agrippa built the Pantheon to be his private temple. The current building was reconstructed by Emperor Hadrian in the second century. More details about Rome Tours

The Pantheon

The best preserved ancient structure in the city, the Pantheon was originally a Roman temple dedicated to the pagan gods: the word “Pantheon” in fact means “Honor all Gods.” The exact age of the Pantheon is unknown but it is believed to be nearly 2000 years old, impressive for withstanding the test of time. It has been used as a church since the 7th century.

Free things to do in Rome : Toss Three Coins into the Trevi Fountain

No trip to Rome is complete without a visit to the beautiful Fontana di Trevi. Have a look at Nicola Salvi’s late Baroque waterworks influenced by an earlier try by Bernini, then follow the Roman tradition of throwing a coin into the fountain to guarantee a return to the Eternal City.

The fountain dates back to ancient Roman times in 19 B.C. when the Roman aqueduct was constructed. The aqueduct brought water to the Roman baths and the fountains of central Rome. The fountain was built at the end of the aqueduct, at the junction of three roads.