Top places to see in London

Seeing London just one time should be on the goal list of any person who likes to see the world. Covering 350 acres, Hyde Park is London’s largest open space and has been a destination for sightseers since 1635. One of the park’s highlights is the Serpentine, an 18th-century man-made lake popular for boating and swimming. Hyde Park is also where you’ll find Speakers’ Corner, a traditional forum for free speech (and heckling). Another Hyde Park landmark is Apsley House, former home of the first Duke of Wellington and purchased after his famous victory at Waterloo. Now a museum, it houses Wellington’s magnificent collections of paintings, including Vel?zquez’s The Waterseller of Seville, along with gifts presented by grateful European kings and emperors. England’s greatest hero is also commemorated at the Wellington Arch.

A trip to London isn’t complete without a visit to the iconic London Eye. Originally constructed to celebrate the millennium, the Eye is a giant ferris wheel offering gorgeous views across the city. At night, the wheel is lit up in seasonal colors and is the centerpiece of London’s annual New Year’s fireworks display.

You can share one of the spacious pods with other keen visitors, or splurge on a private pod for you and someone special. Team your visit to the Eye with a trip to the adjacent London Aquarium to see aquatic creatures from around the world, including jellyfish, seahorses and crocodiles.

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This museum holds fascinating secrets that will blow your mind. The London Transport Museum portrays all that there is to transport. The collections include everything from vehicles and infrastructure to old sound recordings, photographs, and relics. The museum is a great way to learn more about the history of transport in London and explore the transport system that the city is famous for. Guided tours of various transport landmarks happen throughout the year. The museum is situated in Covent Garden Piazza.

Cost: Entry to the London Transport Museum is free for kids and about (?17.50) for adults.

Hyde Park is situated in the heart of London and is known for its greenery, open spaces, and numerous monuments. It was opened to the public in 1637 and is the largest royal park in London. Bordering the south-west edge of the park is the Serpentine, a man-made lake. The lake flows to other parks and landmarks and is popularly used for boating and swimming (mostly by the Royal bloods). The Memorial Fountain for the late Princess of Wales (Diana), The Rose Garden, and Speakers’ Corner are also notable attractions.

How could you miss one of the capital’s most iconic areas? Come and marvel at Nelson’s Column and the four huge lion statues. Feeding the pigeons is now discouraged (due to the spread of diseases), so please don’t bring them any treats.

On the north side of Trafalgar Square, you can visit the National Gallery and just around the corner on St. Martin’s Lane is the National Portrait Gallery. Both have free permanent displays and regular special exhibitions.

Trafalgar Square was designed by John Nash in the 1820s and constructed in the 1830s. It is both a tourist attraction and the main focus for political demonstrations. Look out for the George Washington Statue and the World’s Smallest Police Box, as well as the London Nose.