What can you see in Phi Phi island

Phi Phi island is an amazing looking tropical gropu of islands. The Phi Phi Islands are an island group in Thailand, between the large island of Phuket and the Straits of Malacca coast of Thailand. The larger of the 2 islands, is shaped like a figure 8 and linked by a delicate chain of golden sand. Here stands the island’s original Muslim fishing village, Baan Tonsai, now engulfed by the ever-expanding centre of bungalows, cafes and hotels. A pleasant 1 hour coastal walk from Baan Tonsai will lead you to Had Yao – Long Beach, with tantalising white sands, vibrant offshore marine life and unhindered views of the spectacular cliffs of Phi Phi Leh, 4 kilometres to the south. You’ll also enjoy climbing the steep trails on Phi Phi Don’s 2 massifs – View Point, where you’ll be rewarded with breathtaking views of the island.

Koh Phi Phi’s climate is tropical and warm throughout the year. The northeast monsoon from November into January is wonderful, with breezy clear days and fragrant cool nights. From February to May the breezes end, and the weather is at its best. From November to May, Phi Phi Island has 26 sunny days per month. The southwest monsoon, from late May to October, brings rain and winds to the west coast of southern Thailand, but there are still 20 sunny days per month. Most often it’s only a cool, late afternoon shower, but there can be rainy days on Koh Phi Phi. Seas can be quite rough during this season and swimmers should be careful.

For only 300 Bhat visitors can view the famous and majestic Viking caves of Koh Phi Phi. Towering at the northeastern end of the island, images of long boats have been intricately inscribed along the inside walls of the caves, and many parts are covered in colored chalk. Legend goes that these drawings are the work of pirates and are more than one thousand years old. Watch out for the enthralling sight of many swiftlets roosting in the caves. Extra info on Phi Phi islands tour.

The tropical paradise of Phi Phi Island is composed of two islands: Phi Phi Don and Phi Phi Ley. Although Phi Phi Don is the main island, Phi Phi Ley has quite a bit to offer tourists. Loh Samah Beach is located on the much smaller island of Phi Phi Ley. Since this entire island is surrounded by limestone walls, very little damaged was sustained by the tsunami. To this day, the island and beaches shine like a precious gem. Although the Phi Phi Ley island is uninhabited, it is still a common stopping destination for tourists and diving trips. Most diving trips stop at Loh Samah Beach since the southern coastline bay provides shallow diving for beginners. The cliffs and caves can also provide shelter from the sun and rain. More experienced divers head towards the seaward side of the Loh Samah Beach pinnacle because the current can be fairly strong.

When I’m at the beach, if I gave into my indulgent self, I would be tanning all day with a margarita in hand. However, I do take the occasional day off and attempt to do something active. My go-to activity? Kayaking! It’s fun, it doesn’t feel like a workout, and I get to explore (three of my favorite things!) A lot of people paddle to Monkey beach which is a good 40-50 minute kayak ride. When you get there, sit back, relax under a tree, and go for a swim. You’re lucky if you run into more than 10 people while you are there. Based on the name, naturally, expect to see a few monkeys roaming around the beach and the island’s lush forest areas.

Whether it’s on the Pileh Bay Lagoon, the Bamboo or Mosquito islands, or the other various sites at Ko Phi Phi Don, snorkeling is an unique experience that you must experience at least once. In Hat Yao, a beach in the south coast of Phi Phi Don, you can spot clown fish and black tipped sharks. It’s a 30-minute walk from Ton Sai, or you can take a long-tail boat for around 100 baht from Ton Sai pier. At Loh Samah Bay you’ll be able to see plenty of coral and reef fish such as the angel fish, while in Ao Toh Koh if you’re lucky you might even be able to swim with dolphins!