Lima, Peru attractions and top destinations selection and places to stay

Lima, Peru attractions and top destinations selection: The Magic Water Tour was opened in the Park of the Reserve in 2007, and within a year counted two million visitors. It holds the record for the largest fountain complex in the world, with 13 separate fountains. The largest, the Fuente Magica, shoots a jet of water more than 80 meters high, while the Fuente Tunel de las Sorpresas (Tunnel of Surprises) is a 35-meter tunnel of water to walk through. At the Fuente de la Fantasia, you can see a laser and picture show with jets synchronized to music.

Parque Kennedy, named after the 35th US president, hosts nightly events from dancing to art exhibits. It also houses hundreds of cats that prowl the park at night. Watch the cats and do some people-watching while eating picarones, a fried Peruvian dessert made of fried sweet potatoes dipped in honey. PeƱas are music venues or restaurants, or even someone’s house, where traditional Peruvian music is played by a live band. This music is worlds apart from the electronic cumbia that has captured Lima.

You don’t have to leave Lima to begin your exploration of Peru’s historic sites. Built by the Lima culture sometime between 300 and 700 AD and constructed from millions of adobe bricks, the Huaca Pucllana is a giant pyramid located in Miraflores. After taking a tour of the ruins (don’t forget your sunscreen-the sun can be fierce), head to the site’s restaurant, Restaurant Huaca Pucllana, for some outstanding (but expensive) regional dishes. Nothing quite says Peruvian cuisine like a plate of practically straight-from-the-sea ceviche, and a visit to one of the capital’s top cevicherias should be high on your list of things to do in Lima. A mix of fish, red onions, chili peppers and sweet potato marinated in lemon, you can indulge in this simple yet delicious dish in practically any of the city’s restaurants, but for guaranteed quality, seek out Punto Azul, which is known for its delicate flavors, freshness of its ingredients and accessible price (expect to pay around 32 soles).

Lima is stuffed with old temples, and Magdalena has one of their own, the Huaca Huantille (at the corner of 28 de Julio and Castilla). It was closed the day I went, so if you’d like more information kindly step on over to En Peru, where Stuart as usual has put together a fantastic report. There’s a lot of little places all through Magdalena, but these were some of our favorites: Speciale Cafe – 1229 Jr. Libertad. This cutesy old-time ice cream parlor serves up almost 20 different flavors, including frozen yogurt, and has some of the best espresso in Lima. My tips: get a cup of coffee and a scoop of Cappuccino ice cream to go in it. Rob’s tips: try everything first and then try the Magdalena flavor (with figs, nuts, and chopped cherries) again. They also sell little frozen bonbons that are divine. Explore a few more images of this incredible ocean view penthouse on FB. Need a place to rent in Lima, Peru? Explore even more info at Magdalena del Mar penthouse to book.

Centuries ago, Barranco was a sleepy fishing village. Now it is a coastal district that once was the playground for wealthy Limans. In the 20th century, however, writers and artists began moving in, giving the district a bohemian flavor. This picturesque district is dotted with brightly painted Art Deco houses accented with blossoming trees. During the day, Barranco offers a slower pace of life than Lima, but action picks up when the sun goes down. People flock to the Parque Municipal, dine in small restaurants serving typical Peruvian fare, or dance the night away in discos and nightclubs.